Moving on

After months of using the Edublogs.org service for free, I finally decided to move on and setup my own. Whilst I have learned to work within the limits of the free account, I just couldn’t think of paying a monthly fee just so I can use my iPhone to blog here. I have my own VPS, which hosts several sites already, so it just makes sense to leave.

Thank you very much, Edublogs for such a fine service. I just wish that the basic functionalities that you offered as free before continued to be free. However, I do understand that you need to pay for its maintenance. So, until next time.

BTW, this blog will continue until the end of the year — just so the readers will be fully re-directed to my new site.

Library of the future is here

Cushing Academy of Massachussetts, USA, just did what others can’t do, i.e., remove all dead-tree books and replace it with its digital version. In a Boston.com article, the school reportedly gave away more than half of its 20,000 books collection (while discarding the rest).

β€œWhen I look at books, I see an outdated technology, like scrolls before books,’’ said James Tracy, headmaster of Cushing and chief promoter of the bookless campus.

Flickr image courtesy of Ange Soleil

Flickr image courtesy of Ange Soleil

Personally, here’s how I see it. There is a city library that houses all the collections, in both dead tree and digital. School libraries, on the other hand, house textbooks in digital format. Or maybe, like the case for my university, the University library housing the dead-tree collections and college libraries providing the digital versions of textbooks. The main argument is that e-books and electronic journals are expensive. Whilst they are expensive, I think it is well worth the investment. More students can use it (not dependent on the number of copies of a single title), no need for shelves, no torn or wet pages, no lost copies, no outdated copies (textbooks are outdated the moment they come out of the publisher) and nothing for the librarians to catalog and shelf. Downside for the library, no more fines! πŸ™‚ And oh, library space can be retrofitted with sound-proof areas for discussions, podcasting, video-recording and for reading (of course!). Computers can be provided but with netbooks dramatically dropping in price, all students will be able to afford in 2-3 years.

So what happens to the librarians?